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A fisking of Paul Rosenzweig’s LawFare defense of Mueller against the Trump Transition Letter.

December 19th, 2017 No comments

The pdf file HERE is  a fisking of Paul Rosenzweig’s LawFare defense of Mueller against the Trump Transition Letter.

I got interested in this and have been scanning the web for legal explanations of this kerfuffle, since I am not a lawyer.  There aren’t any good ones. As I said, I’m not a lawyer, but I know a lot of law (I’ve co-authored  numerous scholarly articles with law professors from Indiana, Illinois, UCLA, Chicago, Yale,Tokyo,  and Harvard and I’m the relator in New York ex rel. Eric Rasmusen v. Citigroup). I think I know more law than Mr. Rosenzweig, even though I feel my limitations keenly in this area of law (try me on tax whistleblower law, agency law, or the tax treatment of net operating losses and I’ll do better). So I’ll post this, to better inform the public. Maybe it will encourage real experts to come forward too. I wrote a book on game theory when I was 30 that had lots of mistakes, but it was the first in its field and I did stimulate, I fancy, older and wiser people to write books to improve on mine.

If I have mistakes, please  comment. I see an enormous amount of ignorant and arrogant commenting on these issues on the Internet, though, so please only comment  only if you aren’t just mouthing off. I’ll delete the comment otherwise.

 

How Liberals Think about World Events

August 2nd, 2013 No comments

I came across a very strange article in The American Prospect, “The Rise and Fall of a “Scandal”, about the IRS scandals. It’s noteworthy because it looks at the following figure and concludes that the media, though well-meaning, has unfairly blackened the reputation of the IRS by its coverage.

I look at that, and I conclude that the liberal media covered the scandal at first, but then stopped covering it in accordance with the White House strategy of denying that anything wrong had happened. Read more…

“Delay until They Die”

July 29th, 2013 No comments

Professor Fleischer’s May 16 “A Dickensian Delay at the I.R.S.” at the NYT isn’t looking so good. He said,

Long delays are evidence of ineptitude and a reluctance to tackle difficult issues, not evidence of a political conspiracy. It may be the case that a couple of I.R.S. employees went rogue, as the acting I.R.S. commissioner, Steven T. Miller, suggested on Wednesday before he was ousted from the job.

Aggressive investigation of those individuals may be appropriate. But firing Mr. Miller, as President Obama did on Wednesday, is mere tokenism. The witch hunt obscures the institutional failures that Congress could actually correct.

By now we have heard the testimony of the Cincinnati people, who say Mr. Miller’s IRS was lying when it tried to blame them, Read more…

I Want Comment Triage Software

July 23rd, 2013 No comments

Nobody comments here, so it’s not a personal need, but I want to see comments on blogs and articles organized differently. First I’ll say what I want to see, and then I’ll explain why.

Each comment will be directed to one of four triage categories. These will not be the traditional “Doesn’t need treatment now”, “Needs help”, and “Too hard to help–let him die” categories. Rather, they will be: Read more…

The IRS Scandal— Picking on the Little Guys

June 25th, 2013 No comments

This isn’t the typical tax case, where a lawyer is helpful so the client can avoid breaking the law, or the somewhat rarer one where the lawyer helps the client fix a mess after the client accidentally breaks the law, or the even rarer kind where the lawyer helps the client after client purposely breaks the law. This is a case where a lawyer is helpful so the IRS doesn’t think *it* can get away with breaking the law. Read more…

Categories: administrative law, bureaucracy, IRS Tags: